Day: January 5, 2019

Home Buying – When What You See Is Not What You Get

One thing that every house hunter notices when they look at an open house is neatness. Buyers are so confused about how a perfect house should be in this busy world. They equate neatness to solid structure and faultless condition. Neatness is what they see at the first glance and think to themselves that this is what they want in a house. Because they are insecure in their purchase, anything that is out of place will make them nervous and break the deal. On the other hand, if the house is neat-looking, they will assume that the owner is very meticulous in repair and maintenance.

The truth is, a good house doesn’t have everything to do with how it looks on the outside. The foundation counts, the material used counts and the condition of the plumbing system running around the property counts. Of course, most buyers don’t want to get into the nitty-gritty details during their first few conversation with the seller or agent. However, it is the responsibility of the seller to convince the buyer that the house is structurally sound to survive a tornado and the lofted storage barns are able to withstand the weight of all animals from the local zoo.

If the buyer is still nervous, and as required by the mandatory clause on every contract of sale, a house inspector should be called as soon as possible. The house inspector’s report will reassure the buyer, as it will contain the entire detail of what is going on in the place. These days almost all buyer agents require that the contract include a contingency for complete house inspection paid by the seller and the report be satisfactory to the buyer. The report should be detailed and questions answered, not just the superficial ones. Note that this is a win-win move for both the buyers and sellers. The cost of such inspection will be anywhere from $250 to $500.

Sometimes, the lender will cover the cost of this estimate as a complimentary service. Other times, it is the seller who pays for the inspection plus any action that the inspector suggests that the seller take in order to bring the house to move-in condition. Buyers want to see that the seller takes equal or more trouble in prepping up the house than themselves. Again, they are paying for it, they want to get the best value for their money spent.

As inferred earlier, a house inspector’s report will shed light about any and all-important issues with the house. It will tell you what the sellers wished the buyer didn’t hear or see. The buyer on the other hand should make sure that he or she understands what the report says. A buyer may still be interested in the house in the presence of any fault but may want to negotiate the price. The seller can make the repair and increase the asking price or not repair but agree to reduce the price. In essence, it is left …